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Can clothes be a contributory factor?

Can clothes be a contributory factor?

Postby Peter » Tue May 31, 2005 12:33 pm

I normally go around the house and garden completely in the nude. However this winter for the first time in ten years, I wore clothes at home virtually continuously and it was not long before I developed quite severe seborrheoic eczema with the worst areas being my lower legs and elbows, although I did have small areas on my upper thighs and waist. In the past I had noticed that if I wore clothes for more than a couple of days I developed spots on my legs, which would disappear once I went around nude again. On this occasion I developed spots around my ankles, which my doctor and I both initially thought were cat flee bites, but leaving them untreated they progressed to full blown eczema: I have since discovered that acne type spots can be a symptom of eczema. I had been prescribed various steroid creams, but all they did was exacerbate the condition. I believe that clothes encourage yeast spores, which it is thought may be factor, to multiply and when the skin become sensitive the clothing acts like an abrasive. Whilst I have not yet cleared up my skin, there has been a marked improvement since I have dispensed with clothes and just applied moisturisers such as Aqueous Cream BP or Dermol lotion. In my case sun and air seems to be the best solution. I have resolved not to wear clothes at home unless absolutely necessary: fortunately most of my friends, relations and neighbours accept my lifestyle and in future any visitor will have to express a strong objection in order to make me dress.
Peter
 

Re: Can clothes be a contributory factor?

Postby Peter » Sun Feb 12, 2006 1:03 pm

I am rather disappointed that I have not had a single reaction to my post. I can only reiterate that, whilst it has not completely cured my eczema, it keeps it at a very low level and it only starts to cause problems if I am forced to wear clothes for an extended period. On another web site somebody recounted how his 12 year-old son had gone from specialist to specialist to find a cure for his psoriasis until the seventh dermatologist suggested the lad went around nude and sunbathed- within about 10 days he had a marked improvement and his open and bleeding sores had cleared up. Surely somebody has the courage to try it out, as it must be preferable to steroid creams-it might not work for you, but what have you lost?
Peter
 

Re: Can clothes be a contributory factor?

Postby sods_law » Sun Feb 12, 2006 2:34 pm

Hey Peter,

I think you have a valid point. In the winter the ezcema on my legs is a lot worse than the summer. In the winter I wear trousers, and i develop foliculitis (infected hair folicles) on my legs regularly. Also my arms are affected more. In summer, wearing shorts and no long sleeves, the eczema on my legs more or less clears up completely.

Sadly walking around the house naked isnt an option for me, as a student sharing a house with friends... but i really ought to start wearing shorts as much as possible round the house. In fact, im going to try it:)
sods_law
 

Re: Can clothes be a contributory factor?

Postby Peter » Sun Feb 12, 2006 5:39 pm

I gave an incorrect e:mail address on my previous message(due to problems with ISP's I have had to change e:mail addresss and I managed to mix two together) -it should be twohillside@hotmail.com
Peter
Peter
 

Re: Can clothes be a contributory factor?

Postby Peter » Sat Dec 08, 2007 12:09 pm

I found this quote on another web site- it supports my findings.

"Eczema is something that can be treated by the skin, therefore if we all walked around naked our eczema would be a very little problem, however nobody walks around naked anymore… well a few people do, but they will be arrested for indecent exposure! "
Peter
 

Re: Can clothes be a contributory factor?

Postby Peter » Tue Jul 08, 2008 8:21 am

I seem to have proved beyond reasonable doubt, that in my case clothes are a major factor in exacerbating my eczema. Recently I had a bad chest infection and contrary to my normal practice, I wore clothes around the house. At the end of a fortnight, I had red spots all over my chest- the indication of yeast activity, which, if ignored, would flare up into full blown eczema. Fortunately, soon afterwards we went on a naturist holiday in Provence and fairly quickly my skin improved and now I have virtually no signs of eczema other that a few “dirty” patches. If I got sweaty a few red spots might appear, but due to exposure to the sun and air they did not develop further and soon disappeared. Now I am home, I have already noticed, when I have to wear clothes, it is not long before I start to feel itchy and know that I must get nude at the earliest opportunity.
Peter
 

Re: Can clothes be a contributory factor?

Postby Madhan » Sun Apr 22, 2012 9:34 am

To sum it up in a nutshell, there is a dloube standard that is created by our society. 30+ years ago it was taboo for a woman to wear men’s fashions. Gradually, over a period of several years, women began wearing that which is usually associated with male attire under the guise of ‘fashion’ to a point where it is now socially acceptable for a woman to wear almost anything she wants to without having any fears of social disproval. On the other side of the equation, men’s fashions have remained virtually drab and unchanged for 50+ years. It’s not that many men don’t want it to change, but rather that they don’t want to face the scorn of the public to effect the same acceptance that women have won over the years.Oddly enough, surveys, polls, etc, indicate that about 10% of the male population crossdresses to some extent on a regular basis. Considering that the U.S. population is somewhere near 300 million people, and using half of that number as being male (which I know isn’t exactly correct, but it makes this example easier to understand), that’s 15 million males who enjoy wearing women’s fashions, but have to do so strictly in private to avoid public ridicule.
Madhan
 

Re: Can clothes be a contributory factor?

Postby Jamil » Tue Jun 05, 2012 4:38 pm

For jeans, a 14 is about a 0. And a 16 is about a 1/2. American Eagle has great jeans in every cut, style and wash. And, if she goes and tries them on in before August 10th, she will get a free movie tiekct if she just tries them on. They are pretty inexpensive for name brand and they are always in style- around $ 30 to $ 50 depending on the jean.For shirts she would wear a small. Other stores that have great jeans that are worth chekcing out are Hollister, Abercrombie and Fitch, Aeropostale, etc. All these stores will be cool at school and they carry the current styles. Good luck and have fun!
Jamil
 


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